Microscopic Battlefields The war against cancer and many other…

Microscopic Battlefields

The war against cancer and many other diseases is taking place on a microscopic battlefield. Successful diagnosis and treatment relies on being able to study the affected human tissue under a microscope, for example to determine whether the disease is spreading, or if a treatment is fighting it off. However, preparing tissue samples on microscope slides can be quite time and resource intensive. To help with this, scientists have developed a new inexpensive method of imaging fresh human tissue using ultraviolet light, called MUSE. It can produce high-resolution images of human tissue in minutes, without needing to use slides. MUSE was used to capture this image, which shows nerves (yellow) and fat cells (blue) in breast tissue. This simple technology has the potential to transform the way we do research, and ultimately help to make disease diagnosis quicker and more affordable in hospitals and labs when resources are limited.

Written by Gaëlle Coullon

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Flushed with Emotion Have you ever felt your face flush with…

Flushed with Emotion

Have you ever felt your face flush with embarrassment, or prickle with anger? Just as we recognise these feelings rising, it seems other people do too. Participants in a recent study were often able to spot emotions in strangers’ faces, from changes in blood flow around their cheeks, chin, nose, and eyebrows. The woman in this picture is making happy or angry expressions, but only in the left of each pair is she also producing the distinctive blood patterns associated with the true emotion (her happy cheeks in the top left, for example). While these patterns are universal across age, gender or race, we have different patterns for related emotions, such as ‘angry’ and ‘disgusted’ or ‘happy’ and ‘happily disgusted’ (respectively from the left in the maps bottom row). It’s possible that these subtleties may be missed by some sufferers of expressive agnosia, leading to confusion in reading emotion.

Written by John Ankers

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The last time human beings were far enough away from Earth to…

The last time human beings were far enough away from Earth to see the entire planet at once was December 7, 1972. That’s when the crew of Apollo 17 captured this photograph, which we now call “The Blue Marble.” For obvious reasons, today’s celebration of #EarthDayis one of the most meaningful days of the year for our team. We look forward to another year of searching for and sharing these vast perspectives with you – to inspire the powerful awe that comes when you experience the Overview Effect. We continue to believe that if we can wonder in these view more often, we’ll do what’s right and what’s necessary to protect our one and only home.

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Source imagery: NASA – National Aeronautics and Space Administration

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