Tehran’s first fortification unearthed in Grand Bazaar

A number of ancient pieces from Safavid era, belonging to the first fortification of the Iranian capital, have been unearthed during an excavation in the Grand Bazaar of Tehran.

Tehran’s first fortification unearthed in Grand Bazaar
Credit: M. Mahdi Dorani

The pieces were discovered when construction workers were excavating an old store in Hazrati Bazaar.
“About two months ago, the owner of an old store in Hazrati Bazaar in Molavi Street found some pieces of earthenware while excavating his store,” a report said.

Tehran’s first fortification unearthed in Grand Bazaar
Credit: M. Mahdi Dorani

Tehran municipality never makes an inquiry from the Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization of Iran to issue excavation permission. Now with the finding of the pieces as well as parts of human bones, the ICHTO has stepped into the fray to preserve the pieces.
Since then the archaeologists of the organization have been involved in unearthing and striding the historical pieces.

Tehran’s first fortification unearthed in Grand Bazaar
Credit: M. Mahdi Dorani

According to the Head of the Archeology Department of the ICHTO, based on studies conducted on numerous historical texts as well as reports left by the tourists from Qajar dynasty, it seems the fortofication unearthed in Hazrati Bazaar belongs to the Shāh Abdol-Azīm Shrine, located in Rey, Iran. A descendant of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH), he was entombed there after his death in the 9th century.
The ICHTO official also stressed this is the first time that some architecture pieces from the Safavid era are unearthed in Tehran.

Tehran’s first fortification unearthed in Grand Bazaar
Credit: M. Mahdi Dorani

In an interview with Fars news agency, he went on to say that the main findings include pieces of earthenware which are highly helpful in historical studies. The pieces have already been transferred to a research centre for further investigations.
Elaborating on Hazrati Bazaar excavation, he said there are also other historical pieces including some glass pieces and tiles from various historical eras.

Tehran’s first fortification unearthed in Grand Bazaar
Credit: M. Mahdi Dorani

The excavation was conducted in the basement of a 80-metre store. Efforts are underway, the official said, to turn the store into a museum to preserve the historical pieces and attract more tourists.

Author: Fatemeh Askarieh | Source: Iran Front Page [February 11, 2019]

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Temporary Tube Surgeons are masterful at suturing – stitching…

Temporary Tube

Surgeons are masterful at suturing – stitching tissues together – but even the most skilful doctor might find it difficult to sew together the ends of two tiny, slippery, squishy tubes – as is required when pairing together blood vessels during, say, an organ transplant or reconstructive surgery. To make such tasks easier and therefore faster researchers have developed a stent (pictured) that fits inside the ends of each tube offering a reinforced and more rigid structure to work with. Leaving such a stent inside the vessels is not ideal, however, so this new device is designed to magically melt away. The stent, which has so far been tested in pig arteries, can be 3D printed on demand and is fabricated from a type of sugar – sturdy enough for the surgeon to complete the procedure, but soluble enough to diffuse into the bloodstream in a matter of minutes.

Written by Ruth Williams

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Egyptian officials recover ancient limestone bust that was smuggled to Holland

Egypt’s embassy in Amsterdam has received a limestone statue from the First Intermediate Period which was stolen and smuggled out of the country in the 1990s.

Egyptian officials recover ancient limestone bust that was smuggled to Holland
The recovered statue [Credit: Egypt. Ministry of Antiquities]

Shaaban Abdel Gawad, supervisor general of the Antiquities Repatriation Department at the Ministry of Antiquities, told Ahram Online that the statue was first noticed by the department in March 2018 when it was put on display at an art exhibition hall in Holland.

The department immediately reported the incident to Egypt’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, who contacted the Dutch police and concerned authorities in Holland to confiscate the statue and inform the hall and the owner of the statue that it was a stolen artefact.

Abdel Gawad said that the Dutch authorities had handed the statue over to Egypt’s embassy in Amsterdam and it will return to its homeland soon.

The statue is carved of limestone, he continued, and was uncovered via illegal excavation carried out in 1990s at the Saqqara necropolis.

It depicts a top official named Nekaw-Ptah in a standing posture and wearing a short wig. It also bears hieroglyphic text showing the name of its owner and the date when he lived.

Author: Nevine El-Aref | Source: Ahram Online [February 11, 2019]

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