Bulgaria’s Underwater Archaeology Center in Sozopol Seeks to Buy Research Vessel

This photo shows a Byzantine ship from ca. 900 AD discovered in Bulgaria’s Black Sea zone during the 2016 expedition of the Black Sea M.A.P. project. Photo: Black Sea M.A.P.

The Center for Underwater Archaeology, which is based in the Bulgarian Black Sea resort of Sozopol, has announced a tender for the purchase of a new maritime research vessel.

The Center for Underwater Archaeology, which is an institute of Bulgaria’s Ministry of Culture, seeks to acquire the ship for approximately BGN 375,000, VAT excluded, reports local news site Top Novini Burgas.

Adding Bulgaria’s 20% value-added tax brings the total projected price to BGN 450,000 (app. EUR 225,000).

The ship that the Sozopol Center for Underwater Archaeology seeks to acquire should be multi-purpose scientific vessel specially designed for geophysical and hydrographic research with diving devices.

The geophysical and hydrographic research equipment is to be purchased separately, and its acquisition is not part of the present tender.

The detailed requirements for the vessel are designed to make sure that the Bulgarian maritime archaeologists will be able to use it for research in the Black Sea, beyond the 12 nautical miles of territorial waters.

Bidders in the tender are expected to submit their proposals by January 30, 2017. The proposals are to be opened at the Center for Underwater Archaeology in Sozopol on January 31, 2017.

Source Archaeology in Bulgaria

New Comet: C/2017 A3 (Elenin)

CBET nr. 4344, issued on 2017, January 11, announces the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~18.2) by L. Elenin on three CCD images obtained with 0.4-m f/2.4 reflector + CCD at the ISON-SSO Observatory at Siding Spring on Jan. 5.4 UT. The new comet has been designated C/2017 A3 (Elenin).
I performed follow-up measurements of this object, while it was still on the neocp. Stacking of 20 unfiltered exposures, 120 seconds each, obtained remotely on 2017, Jan 06.5 from Q62 (iTelescope network) through a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer, shows that this object is a comet with a compact coma nearly 10 arcsec in diameter elongated toward PA 40.
My confirmation image (click on it for a bigger version)
M.P.E.C. 2017-A75 assigns the following preliminary parabolic orbital elements to comet C/2017 A3: T 2017 Jan. 20.6; e= 1.0; Peri. =  301.87; q = 3.91;  Incl.= 99.12
by Ernesto Guido

Source Remanzacco Observatory

Golubac fortress, Serbia

The Golubac Fortress was a medieval fortified town on the south side of the Danube River, 4 km downstream from the modern-day town of Golubac, Serbia. The fortress, which was most likely built during the 14th century, is split into three compounds which were built in stages. It has ten towers, most of which started square, and several of which received many-sided reinforcements with the advent of firearms.
Golubac Fortress has had a tumultuous history. Prior to its construction it was the site of a Roman settlement. During the Middle Ages, it became the object of many battles, especially between the Ottoman Empire and the Kingdom of Hungary. It changed hands repeatedly, passing between Turks, Bulgarians, Hungarians, Serbs, and Austrians, until 1867, when it was turned over to the Serbian Knez, Mihailo Obrenović III. Now, it is a popular tourist attraction in the region and a sightseeing point on Danube boat tours.

Source hiddenandlittleknownplaces