Hadrian’s Wall being damaged by ‘nighthawk’ metal detectorists

Hadrian’s Wall, built by the Romans nearly 2,000 years ago to defend the northern limits of their empire, is being damaged by illegal metal detectorists.

Hadrian's Wall being damaged by 'nighthawk' metal detectorists
Archaeologists have warned of damage caused by nighthawks in the illegal search
for treasure along Hadrian’s Wall [Credit: Rex]

Archaeologists from the Historic England conservation group have called on visitors to report illegal treasure-hunting to the police after more than 50 holes were discovered on a section of the site.

The 117 km wall is a UNESCO World Heritage Site stretching across northern England from the North Sea to the Irish Sea. Its construction was ordered under the Emperor Hadrian in the 120s AD.

Hadrian's Wall being damaged by 'nighthawk' metal detectorists
Historic England is calling on visitors to Hadrian’s Wall and Tyne Valley residents
to report illegal metal detecting [Credit: PA]

Mike Collins, Historic England’s Inspector of Ancient Monuments at the wall, said so-called “nighthawk” clandestine detectorists are “breaking the law and robbing us all of the knowledge and understanding that objects from the past can give us.”

The wall has long been prone to damage. Conservation efforts only began in the 18th and 19th centuries after centuries of stones from the wall being stolen for the construction of castles and churches.

Source: Reuters [June 20, 2018]

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Ancient site belonging to 5th millennium BCE discovered in southern Iran

An ancient site belonging to the fifth millennium BCE has been discovered in a port city in Bushehr province, southern Iran.

Ancient site belonging to 5th millennium BCE discovered in southern Iran
Credit: IRNA

According to director general of the Cultural Heritage, Handcraft and Tourism Department of Bushehr Province, Naser Amirzadeh, “this historical site was discovered in Tahamachi hill area, located three kilometres west of the village of Ameri, in the port city of Deylam.”

The site discovered indicates that an ancient civilisation had existed in this region, he added.

Based on the information received from security units in Deylam port, and after the discovery of adobe structures by local people, a team of experts from the Cultural Heritage Organisation was deployed to the area, he noted.

“This historical site is located in a vast plain near the village of Shah Abdollah. There are large hills of 5 to 6 metres high above the surface of the surrounding lands that are home to historical and cultural items which are clearly visible,” IRNA quoted Amirzadeh as saying.

Ancient site belonging to 5th millennium BCE discovered in southern Iran
Credit: IRNA

Amirzadeh also mentioned that artefacts found on the hills include ceramics with brown geometric patterns in dark green and black colours.

“In addition to pottery, stone-tools and bones have also been found on the site,” underlined Amirzadeh.

“Considering the initial findings in the region, which were first identified in the port city of Deylam, it can be guesstimated that the site dates back to the 5th millennium BCE, which is historically very significant for the Persian Gulf coast.”

Source: Iran Front Page [june 19, 2018]

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