ancientcoins: In honor of Halloween, I share a coin featuring…

ancientcoins:

In honor of Halloween, I share a coin featuring the “witchy” goddess, Hekate. I discovered at my seminar that Hekate is one of the least common divinities on coins, undoubtedly because of her supernatural and infernal associations. Hekate (sometimes transliterated Hecate) was the goddess of magic, witchcraft and ghosts. She is famous for her sorcery and her knowledge of herbs, spells, and poisons. On earth, her cult appeared most often at cross-roads and other liminal spaces, where the borders between worlds were thin.

On this coin she appears as Hekate Triformis, Hekate of the three bodies, a form in which she was shown to have power over heaven, earth, and hell. She is paralleled to the three fates, the three furies, and the three graces as one of a number of Greco-Roman goddesses associated with the number three.

The coin is of the empress Otacilia Severa, 
wife of Philip I, from Laodikeia in Asia Minor. Hekate was a particularly important goddess in Asia Minor, where she was associated with the Egyptian goddess Isis and with the Great Mother goddess, Cybele.

Otacilia Severa AE of Laodikeia, Phrygia. . 244-249 AD 12.09 g. M WTAKIL CEBHRA CE, diademed, draped bust right / LAODIKEWN NEWKORWN, Hekate Triformis holding torches, serpent, whip and knives, standing; hound at foot right. BMC 255 var

Bringing this back. Happy Halloween, everyone!

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Adhesives and composite materials made from Swiss tree…

Adhesives and composite materials made from Swiss tree bark

Studies conducted by the National Research Programme “Resource Wood” show that tannins extracted from native tree bark can be used to produce adhesives and composite materials. An additional area of application might be 3D printing.

The bark of native conifers is known as a waste product in the timber industry. It is mostly burnt or used as garden mulch. A team from the National Research Programme “Resource Wood” (NRP 66) has now developed a new process to extract valuable tannins from tree bark to produce adhesives and composite materials.

Tannins are a hot topic not only among wine experts. They are also in the focus of Swiss wood research. Frédéric Pichelin and his team at the Bern University of Applied Sciences in Biel see great potential in native tree barks. “If we take cascaded use seriously, we need to find ways of using tree bark because the wood industry produces plenty of it. This offers new sources of income, based on a renewable resource, to saw mills and the manufacturing industry,” Frédéric Pichelin explains.

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